Are you brainstorming names for a new baby or pet? Are you trying to come up with that perfect alias for your stint undercover?

The Social Security Administration has a great database of baby names that searches all Social Security card applications for births after 1879.  But what was popular before that?

Thanks to a collection of cemetery records from Earlville, NY, we can offer you some exciting insight and inspiration for your next little bundle of joy.

If you’re having a girl, you probably already considered the old standbys, like Mary and Sarah, but have you considered these options?


Flavilla

Lavantia

Sarepta

Avoline

Willara

Peddy

Lurea

Leonora

Thankful

What, you haven’t? Well, you’re lucky you came to this blog! If you’re having a boy, I hope you’ll also consider the following 19th Century gems:


Hazard

Cyrenius

Amasa

Cordelius

Elisha

Elam

Eber

Dimmick

Peleg
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One Response to 19th Century Names

  1. Susan D'Entremont says:

    I live in a neighborhood with a high percentage of Jews, and several of the boys’ names listed are somewhat common here. Interestingly, the girls’ names listed above don’t seem to have the same Biblical/Hebrew roots as the boys’ names. Am curious about the roots of “Hazard.” I know it is a surname, but obviously has another common meaning. Wonder how or if the word and the surname are related. Will have to find the Oxford-English dictionary.

    Cool item! I will check out the rest of the collection.

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NewYorkHeritage.org is a research portal for students, educators, historians, genealogists, and others who are interested in learning more about the people, places and institutions of historical New York State. The site provides immediate free access to more than 160 distinct digital collections that reflect New York State's long history.
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