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New York Heritage http://www.nyheritage.org/blog Thu, 11 Dec 2014 14:57:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 test http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/12/11/test/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/12/11/test/#comments Thu, 11 Dec 2014 14:57:16 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=528 to test the post

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Colorizing the Past http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/06/18/colorizing-the-past/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/06/18/colorizing-the-past/#comments Wed, 18 Jun 2014 16:20:58 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=499 I recently learned how to colorize black-and-white photographs with a course on Lynda.com (thanks for the opportunity, NY 3Rs Association!).  Naturally, I put these new-found skills to use on some of the wonderful old photographs accessible on New York Heritage.

Choosing a collection to pluck photos from was difficult; there are so [...]]]> I recently learned how to colorize black-and-white photographs with a course on Lynda.com (thanks for the opportunity, NY 3Rs Association!).  Naturally, I put these new-found skills to use on some of the wonderful old photographs accessible on New York Heritage.

Choosing a collection to pluck photos from was difficult; there are so many and they all have gems!  After falling down the rabbit hole of browsing collections, I decided on the George W. Fenner World War I Photographs of Syracuse, NY, a collection from the Onondaga County Public Library’s Local History & Genealogy Department.

Fenner was a staff photographer for the local paper in Syracuse and these professional-quality photos of his show how Central New York responded to the Great War.

These men are both clergymen: Pastor Frederick W. Betts and Rev. George S. Mahon. Betts was born in Illinois but came to New York to study at St. Lawrence University from 1884 to 1885. He moved to Syracuse to become the minister of the First Church, a position he held until his death in 1932. (Incidentally, he served as president on the Board of Syracuse Public Library, so we are particularly grateful for his civic contributions). Mahon was the founding Roman Catholic priest of the Church of the Holy Rosary in 1913 on the west side of Syracuse and served his parish until his death in 1930.

But what might they have looked like in color?! These proud Syracuse citizens became my dignified colorization guinea pigs.

syracusepastors

Can you tell what the tricks of colorizing are?   Step one was to increase the dynamic range, making whites whiter and blacks blacker.  Step two was to clean up the scratches and dust that are inherent with scanned images of 100 year old photos.  Step three, the most intensive and time consuming, is to treat your cleaned up image in Photoshop like a coloring book from  your childhood.  Using pens, brushes, and layers, you can colorize areas and then fiddle with the result using hue & saturation levels.

Admittedly, my final products are not of expert quality, but they were fun to make and, I hope, pose as a reminder that these black and white photographs were of real, living people in the not-so-very-distant past.

FiveSons

This woman was photographed by Fenner during the 1917 Fourth of July Parade in Syracuse.  Each star on her flag represents a son; she had five boys in service during World War I.   This photograph appeared on page 3 of the Syracuse Herald on Monday Evening, November 26, 1917.

Proud as I may be of my new coloring skills, I still have a while to go before I can do in Photoshop what some people did so well by hand:

Mrs. Packard, a matriarch of the wealthy Packard family of Lakewood, NY, was brought to colorful life the old fashioned way, with colored pencils and time.

]]> http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/06/18/colorizing-the-past/feed/ 0 Recording Disasters: Floods of 1913 http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/06/12/recording-disasters-floods-of-1913/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/06/12/recording-disasters-floods-of-1913/#comments Thu, 12 Jun 2014 18:30:11 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=480 Generally, New York State is a quiet place.  We’re not tornado central, our earthquakes are pretty tame, and it’s been a long time since a tsunami has reached Oneonta.

That said, we have had our fair share of terrible storms and consequential floods.  A lot of those floods from the 20th Century were documented carefully [...]]]> Generally, New York State is a quiet place.  We’re not tornado central, our earthquakes are pretty tame, and it’s been a long time since a tsunami has reached Oneonta.

That said, we have had our fair share of terrible storms and consequential floods.  A lot of those floods from the 20th Century were documented carefully and are now available on New York Heritage.

1913flood

In early 1913, a severe winter storm hit the Eastern, Midwest, and Southern parts of the United States.  It was the most geographically widespread natural disaster the United States had suffered up to that point in its history, and the effects of the storm reverberated.

In the case of the Albany area, it meant some destructive flooding of main thoroughfares.  The Watervliet Public Library has a collection of images from this 1913 flood:

1913 Flood in Watervliet, NY - 14th Street & 1st Avenue

1913 Flood in Watervliet, NY - 14th Street & Second Avenue, Looking West

1913 Flood in Watervliet, NY - Second Avenue

The St. Lawrence County Historical Association has some records of 1913′s damage in Helena, after an ice jam on the St. Regis River caused flooding.

Helena Flood, 1913

Helena Flood, 1913

Helena Flood, 1913

The March 1913 floods were so severe in other parts of the country that Salvation Army members from New York City traveled to Dayton, Ohio to help out:

Members of the Salvation Army relief corps about to depart for the Dayton, Ohio flood, March 1913. Appear to be posed on the roof of a building.

Why head to Dayton?  A 1913 issue of the Westfield Republican newspaper reported on March 26th that “the mayor of Dayton… has telegraphed that 5,000 perished in his city in the flood after the breaking of the levees of the Big Miami river.”  Furthermore, according to the article, three-quarters of the city were underwater, and a substantial number of buildings were on fire.  100 years later, we know that fewer than 500 Daytonians actually lost their lives, but that’s still a whole lot!

But in New York State, engineering prevailed against Mother Nature in many places. In Rochester, the aqueduct once declared the longest stone bridge in America survived the flooding of March 1913. The Rochester Museum & Science Center collection includes some images of this aqueduct holding back the swirling Genesee waters.

Flood waters swirl around the aqueduct near Broad Street

Aqueduct arches under flood waters

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Albany Public Library http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/05/14/albany-public-library/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/05/14/albany-public-library/#comments Wed, 14 May 2014 15:15:43 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=463 Albany Public Library is happy to have recently joined NY Heritage!  Though our collection will grow over time, we have already made some very interesting objects available.  We would like to highlight “A Bicentennial of Albany Views: 1963-1967 and 1974-1975 Compared.”

This album of photographs was handmade by Florence L. Powell, a [...]]]> Albany Public Library is happy to have recently joined NY Heritage!  Though our collection will grow over time, we have already made some very interesting objects available.  We would like to highlight “A Bicentennial of Albany Views: 1963-1967 and 1974-1975 Compared.”

This album of photographs was handmade by Florence L. Powell, a Historical Research Assistant for the City of Albany, in 1976.  Urban renewal is a blanket term for programs, largely initiated by the Federal government, which demolished and rebuilt large sections of America’s urban environments.   Highways, office buildings, parking structures, and civic centers often replaced historic buildings, low-rise housing, and private businesses.  In Albany, the construction of Interstate 787 is the most visible and lasting evidence of urban renewal.  The commensurate destruction of older buildings and reshaping of streets is documented in Powell’s work.

Albany, New York, A Bicentennial of Albany Views: 1963-1967 and 1974-1975 Compared In the mid-1960s, Powell was a resident of the Clinton Square neighborhood of Albany, the area where North Pearl Street and Broadway meet Clinton Avenue.  By 1963, demolition of buildings had begun as part of the urban renewal projects initiated across America by the federal government.  Powell said she felt that, “one of these days there would be those who would want to know what the old area had looked like, and that there should be a permanent record of the area.”  With this impetus, she “began in leisure moments and at weekends” to take photographs of the streets and buildings in the Clinton Square neighborhood.

In 1975, Powell covered the same ground with her camera and her dog, a collie named “Blackie,” and took photographs of the same locations- where those locations still existed. The effects of the urban renewal projects in Albany, which changed the character of neighborhoods, are shown in the side-by-side images of Powell’s album.  At the urging of future NYS Assemblyman Jack McEneny, Powell assembled the pictures into an album and distributed five copies. One of those albums now resides in Albany Public Library’s Pruyn Collection of Albany History and online at NY Heritage.

Albany, New York, A Bicentennial of Albany Views: 1963-1967 and 1974-1975 Compared

For any researcher or layperson seeking to understand the effects of urban renewal on a neighborhood, Powell’s album is a must.  And as Powell notes, “Besides being historically interesting, the whole project has been a most pleasant pursuit for me, and of course for my collie, ‘Blackie,’ who was my guard in isolated places making the entire project possible.”  We hope your time on Albany Public Library’s NY Heritage Collections is a pursuit as eye-opening as Powell’s.

If you are interested in seeing what this part of Albany looks like today, mark September 13 on your calendar for a walking tour this fall!  The Albany Heritage Area Visitors Center, Albany City Historian Tony Opalka, and staff from the Pruyn Collection of Albany History at the Albany Public Library worked together to create a walking tour inspired by Powell’s photo album.

Before the walking tour, we’ll examine the dramatic streetscape changes captured by the photographer, Florence L. Powell, a historical research assistant for the city of Albany, and learn about the buildings and entire city blocks demolished in the process.  We’ll then go on a 30 minute walk to retrace the footsteps of the photographer, learn about the neighborhood today, and note any new changes that have developed over the last 40 years.

This tour group will meet inside The Albany Heritage Area Visitors Center; 25 Quackenbush Square, Albany, NY 12207 (Corner of Broadway and Clinton Ave.)  Please register by calling 427-4303 or emailing localhistory@albanypubliclibrary.org.

A Photo Album Walking Tour – The Demolition and Renewal of Albany’s Clinton Square Neighborhood

    September 13th (Sat) at 1pm  (Rain Date is Sunday September 14th 1pm)

    The tour group will meet at The Albany Heritage Area Visitors Center; 

    25 Quackenbush Square, Albany, NY 12207 (Corner of Broadway and Clinton Ave.)

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Albany Collections in the News http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/05/08/albany-collections-in-the-news/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/05/08/albany-collections-in-the-news/#comments Thu, 08 May 2014 14:07:51 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=447 The Albany area is well represented in New York Heritage and lately, some of these great collections have been featured on All Over Albany, a great website that highlights special things about and to do in the Capital region.

In April, the site explored the recently added Albany Public Library collection from their Pruyn [...]]]> The Albany area is well represented in New York Heritage and lately, some of these great collections have been featured on All Over Albany, a great website that highlights special things about and to do in the Capital region.

In April, the site explored the recently added Albany Public Library collection from their Pruyn Room.  The article, “Views of Albany then, now online,” features images from the Views of Albany digital collection.

 

This collection is made up of images from 1920 to 1950, showing off views of the city.

Then this past week, the site pointed to another collection, the Steinmetz Digital Collection of Schenectady, a collaboration of the miSci Museum of Innovation and Science (formerly know as: the Schenectady Museum of & Suits-Bueche Planetarium), Schenectady County Historical Society, and Edison-Steinmetz Center.

Steinmetz was General Electric’s chief engineer in the 1890s and into the 1900s.  Here he is pictured with Thomas Edison in 1922:

All Over Albany’s article, “Even Geniuses Need a Nap Now and Then,” recommends you check out the documentary, Divine Discontent: Charles Proteus Steinmetz, on the local PBS station, WMHT, on Sunday May 11th at 3pm or Tuesday May 13th at 8pm.

]]> http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/05/08/albany-collections-in-the-news/feed/ 1 Grants Awarded for New Collections on NYHeritage http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/04/24/grants-awarded-for-new-collections-on-nyheritage/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/04/24/grants-awarded-for-new-collections-on-nyheritage/#comments Thu, 24 Apr 2014 02:29:17 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=438 South Central Regional Library Council (SCRLC) has awarded two Regional Bibliographic Data Bases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing (RBDB) Grants to member organizations in support of digitization.

The first award, given to the Cortland County Historical Society, will provide $1,044 to digitize the Society’s large collection of Brockway Company-related images currently in one [...]]]> South Central Regional Library Council (SCRLC) has awarded two Regional Bibliographic Data Bases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing (RBDB) Grants to member organizations in support of digitization.

The first award, given to the Cortland County Historical Society, will provide $1,044 to digitize the Society’s large collection of Brockway Company-related images currently in one of several formats (35 mm b&w and color film, 3X5 medium format negatives, 4×5 large format negatives). The entire collection totals more than 1,000 images.

You can see the first handful of Brockway images on New York Heritage already, including the image to the right.

According to CCHS Director Mindy Leisenring, “the Brockway Company produced trucks until 1977.

Mack Truck, which had purchased the family-owned business in 1956, then closed the Cortland manufacturing facility, which had been a critical economic driver for the community. Its reputation had spread as trucks manufactured in Cortland were purchased by companies and municipalities worldwide.

As such, the company’s archives, including the digital images this grant will make possible, is an important resource for studies investigating twentieth-century deindustrialization, globalization and workplace history.”

The second award, given to SUNY Oneonta’s Milne Library in partnership with  the Delaware County Historical Association and the Greater Oneonta Historical Society, will provide $8,490 to initiate a pilot project to begin the digitization of historical materials of regional and statewide significance. 

SUNY Oneonta is already an active participant on New York Heritage.  Their collection can be found here.  DCHA has already begun digitization, including the fantastic Bob Wyer photography collection, one of which is shown at the right.

According to Project Director Andy Perry, Head of Library Technology at Milne Library, “DCHA and GOHS both house unique primary source materials unavailable elsewhere.

For example, the Sherwood collection, located in the DCHA archives, provides valuable insight into the daily lives of people in antebellum New York. Attorney Samuel Sherwood (1779-1862) was a U.S. Congressman (1813-1815) from Delhi, NY. The family moved to New York City in 1830 but continued to spend summers in Delhi.

An example of the rich content included in this collection is the 1823 travel diary of Laura Sherwood. The diary describes people, scenery, accommodations, and villages as the Sherwood family travelled on horseback from Delhi to Canada.”

In addition, this project will provide valuable experience for SUNY Oneonta students who may be considering future careers as archivists.

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Stereograms in Motion http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/01/20/stereograms-in-motion/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/01/20/stereograms-in-motion/#comments Mon, 20 Jan 2014 17:33:40 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=429 What can I say?  I love making these, and I think I’ve waited long enough since our last post about stereograph animations.

Trophy Point, West Point

http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/aiha/id/37/rec/29

In 1778 George Washington ordered Polish engineer Colonel Thaddeus Kosciusko to construct an iron chain to block passage of [...]]]> What can I say?  I love making these, and I think I’ve waited long enough since our last post about stereograph animations.

TrophyPoint

Trophy Point, West Point

http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/aiha/id/37/rec/29

In 1778 George Washington ordered Polish engineer Colonel Thaddeus Kosciusko to construct an iron chain to block passage of British ships from sailing to Albany. The chain stretched between West Point and Constitution Island. A ring of thirteen original links, representing the thirteen American colonies, attracts tourists to the grounds of West Point Military Academy.

ProspectMtn

 

Prospect Mountain House, Lake George

http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/crandall/id/143/rec/29

A young man gazing at a nice house on Lake George around the turn of the century.

FairyFloatA Fairy Turnout, Saratoga Springs

http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/sspl/id/14/rec/13

The Floral Fete parade in 1902 included floats, bicycles, and various types of carriages decorated in flowers. This stereoview image shows a young boy in his floral decorated cart pulled by two goats. His entry number is 31. Part of a decorated bicycle can be seen in the background.

]]> http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2014/01/20/stereograms-in-motion/feed/ 0 19th Century Names http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/12/09/19th-century-names/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/12/09/19th-century-names/#comments Mon, 09 Dec 2013 22:06:18 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=410 Are you brainstorming names for a new baby or pet? Are you trying to come up with that perfect alias for your stint undercover?

The Social Security Administration has a great database of baby names that searches all Social Security card applications for births after 1879.  But what was popular before that?

Thanks [...]]]> Are you brainstorming names for a new baby or pet? Are you trying to come up with that perfect alias for your stint undercover?

The Social Security Administration has a great database of baby names that searches all Social Security card applications for births after 1879.  But what was popular before that?

Thanks to a collection of cemetery records from Earlville, NY, we can offer you some exciting insight and inspiration for your next little bundle of joy.

If you’re having a girl, you probably already considered the old standbys, like Mary and Sarah, but have you considered these options?


Flavilla

Lavantia

Sarepta

Avoline

Willara

Peddy

Lurea

Leonora

Thankful

What, you haven’t? Well, you’re lucky you came to this blog! If you’re having a boy, I hope you’ll also consider the following 19th Century gems:


Hazard

Cyrenius

Amasa

Cordelius

Elisha

Elam

Eber

Dimmick

Peleg
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Yearbook Designs http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/11/07/yearbook-designs/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/11/07/yearbook-designs/#comments Thu, 07 Nov 2013 18:28:44 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=402 New York Heritage has hundreds and hundreds of digitized yearbooks, which you can see and browse or search by school on our Yearbooks page.

Recently we’ve pinned nearly 100 of our favorite yearbook designs over on Pinterest.  You can see the board here:Yearbooks Over the Years.

My only disappointment with Pinterest is [...]]]> New York Heritage has hundreds and hundreds of digitized yearbooks, which you can see and browse or search by school on our Yearbooks page.

Recently we’ve pinned nearly 100 of our favorite yearbook designs over on Pinterest.  You can see the board here:Yearbooks Over the Years.

My only disappointment with Pinterest is that you can’t rearrange your pins.  I’d really love to sort these great yearbook covers by date to see the different design trends over the years, so I thought I’d do it here!

So what did our favorite yearbook covers look like…

 
In the conservative 20s?

Normalian 1923

Pioneer 1926

Watertown Yearbook 1927

Gridiron 1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the classic 30s?

Gridiron 1931

Clarksonian 1932

Ontarian 1935

Pioneer 1935

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the adventurous 40s?

Cardinal 1941

Coltonian 1943

Pioneer 1944

Watertown Yearbook 1949

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the angular 50s?

Clarksonian 1954

Hornet 1955

Ontarian 1955

Seymour 1958

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the shapely 60s?

Gridiron 1961

Memories 1961

Coltonian 1966

Jeffersonian 1967

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the psychedelic 70s?

Sandstoner 1970

Centralian 1973

Coltonian 1973

Clarksonian 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the futuristic 80s?

Watertown Yearbook 1981

Keystoner 1983

Tatler 1985

Hornet 1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the graphic 90s?

Sandstoner 1990

Algonquin 1990

Morrisania 1992

Coltonian 1996

 

 

 

 

 

 
In the modern age?

Pioneer 2002

Tatler 2006

Memories 2009

Sandstoner 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 
One thing’s for certain- your yearbook cover shouldn’t be boring! Check out the rest of our favorites on Pinterest and tell us what design speaks to you.

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Streetviews: Then & Now http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/09/16/streetviews-then-now/ http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/2013/09/16/streetviews-then-now/#comments Mon, 16 Sep 2013 20:16:06 +0000 Claire Enkosky http://www.nyheritage.org/blog/?p=352 It’s time for more then-and-now with Google Map Streetview!

Pulaski Park in Syracuse, NY: 2011 & 1950s

Little Falls Public Library, Little Falls, NY: 2008 & 1800s

Elmwood Avenue in Geneva, NY: 2009 & ca. 1900

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It’s time for more then-and-now with Google Map Streetview!

Pulaski Park in Syracuse, NY: 2011 & 1950s

Pulaski Park in Syracuse, NY: 2011Pulaski Park in Syracuse, NY: 1950s

Little Falls Public Library, Little Falls, NY: 2008 & 1800s

Little Falls Public Library, Little Falls, NY: 2008

Elmwood Avenue in Geneva, NY: 2009 & ca. 1900

Elmwood Avenue in Geneva, NY: 2009

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